Red Flag 14-1 going full throttle!

1/29/2014 - Red Flag 14-1 is underway at Nellis AFB in Nevada. Following are some hi-resolution photographs of aircraft from the U.S. and allied nations participating in the exercise (click on the photos to enlarge).

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 391st Fighter Squadron at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, takes off during Red Flag 14-1 at Nellis AFB, Nev. The 414th Combat Training Squadron’s staff conduct the planning conferences where unit representatives and planning staff members develop the size and scope of their unit’s participation in Red Flag. All aspects of the exercise, including billeting of service members, transportation to Nellis AFB, range coordination, ordnance and munitions scheduling, and development of training scenarios designed to be as realistic as possible, fully exercising each participating unit's capabilities and objectives. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 391st Fighter Squadron at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, takes off during Red Flag 14-1 at Nellis AFB, Nev. The 414th Combat Training Squadron’s staff conduct the planning conferences where unit representatives and planning staff members develop the size and scope of their unit’s participation in Red Flag. All aspects of the exercise, including billeting of service members, transportation to Nellis AFB, range coordination, ordnance and munitions scheduling, and development of training scenarios designed to be as realistic as possible, fully exercising each participating unit’s capabilities and objectives. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

Two Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18 Hornets assigned to 77th Squadron take off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Red Flag 14-1 is an air-to-air combat training exercise in the skies over the Nevada Test and Training Range. The purpose of the exercise is to increase the combat capability of U.S. and allied air forces for future combat situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

Two Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18 Hornets assigned to 77th Squadron take off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Red Flag 14-1 is an air-to-air combat training exercise in the skies over the Nevada Test and Training Range. The purpose of the exercise is to increase the combat capability of U.S. and allied air forces for future combat situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

An EA-6B Prowler assigned to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The mission of the MAW is to conduct air operations in support of the Marine Forces to include offensive air support, anti-air warfare, assault support, aerial reconnaissance, electronic warfare, and control of aircraft and missiles. Red Flag provides aircrew an opportunity to experience realistic combat scenarios to prepare and train aircrews in the event of future conflicts or war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

An EA-6B Prowler assigned to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The mission of the MAW is to conduct air operations in support of the Marine Forces to include offensive air support, anti-air warfare, assault support, aerial reconnaissance, electronic warfare, and control of aircraft and missiles. Red Flag provides aircrew an opportunity to experience realistic combat scenarios to prepare and train aircrews in the event of future conflicts or war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 64th Aggressors Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. takes off during Red Flag 14-1 at Nellis AFB. The mission of the 414th Combat Training Squadron, the unit that plans and executes Red Flag, is to maximize the combat readiness and survivability of participants by providing a realistic training environment. There are approximately 125 aircraft participating in Red Flag 14-1. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 64th Aggressors Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. takes off during Red Flag 14-1 at Nellis AFB. The mission of the 414th Combat Training Squadron, the unit that plans and executes Red Flag, is to maximize the combat readiness and survivability of participants by providing a realistic training environment. There are approximately 125 aircraft participating in Red Flag 14-1. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

A KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 92nd Air Refueling Wing at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Red Flag is hosted by the 414th Combat Training Squadron. In a typical Red Flag exercise, friendly blue forces engage hostile red forces in realistic combat situations in air, space and cyberspace. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

A KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 92nd Air Refueling Wing at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Red Flag is hosted by the 414th Combat Training Squadron. In a typical Red Flag exercise, friendly blue forces engage hostile red forces in realistic combat situations in air, space and cyberspace. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Couillard)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor assigned to Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis AFB, Nev. Red Flag Provides Airmen from U.S. and allied countries an opportunity to experience realistic combat scenarios to prepare and train in the event of future conflicts or war. The training exercise’s missions take place over the 2.9 million acre Nevada Test and Training Range. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler)

A U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor assigned to Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis AFB, Nev. Red Flag Provides Airmen from U.S. and allied countries an opportunity to experience realistic combat scenarios to prepare and train in the event of future conflicts or war. The training exercise’s missions take place over the 2.9 million acre Nevada Test and Training Range. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler)

A Royal Air Force Tornado GR4 assigned to the IX Bomber Squadron from Royal Air Force Station Marham, United Kingdom, takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Red Flag gives aircrews and air support operations service members from various airframes, military services and allied countries an opportunity to integrate and practice combat operations. These situations provide the pilots with real-time war scenarios and also helps ground crews test and improve their combat readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler)

A Royal Air Force Tornado GR4 assigned to the IX Bomber Squadron from Royal Air Force Station Marham, United Kingdom, takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Red Flag gives aircrews and air support operations service members from various airframes, military services and allied countries an opportunity to integrate and practice combat operations. These situations provide the pilots with real-time war scenarios and also helps ground crews test and improve their combat readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler)

A Royal Air Force E-3 Sentry assigned to the VIII Squadron at RAF Station Waddington, United Kingdeom. takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The E-3 Sentry provides situational awareness of friendly, neutral and hostile activity, command and control of an area of responsibility, battle management of theater forces, all-altitude and all-weather surveillance of the battle space, and early warning of enemy during joint, allied and coalition operations. Red Flag 14-1 is an air-to-air combat training exercise designed to increase combat effectiveness and has expanded to incorporate all spectrums of warfare including command and control, real-time intelligence, analysis and exploitation and electronic warfare. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler)

A Royal Air Force E-3 Sentry assigned to the VIII Squadron at RAF Station Waddington, United Kingdom. takes off during Red Flag 14-1 Jan. 28, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The E-3 Sentry provides situational awareness of friendly, neutral and hostile activity, command and control of an area of responsibility, battle management of theater forces, all-altitude and all-weather surveillance of the battle space, and early warning of enemy during joint, allied and coalition operations. Red Flag 14-1 is an air-to-air combat training exercise designed to increase combat effectiveness and has expanded to incorporate all spectrums of warfare including command and control, real-time intelligence, analysis and exploitation and electronic warfare. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler)

The F-22 Raptor is one of the most feared players at these Red Flag exercises. And indeed they should be, as one can understand when they watch this video and a former wing commander talks (at 2:20 in the video) about how the F-22 comes out on top when confronted by a scenario where 4 F-22s and a few F-15s go up against 40 “adversaries” and win. Incredible!

Below, a brief look at and discussion about the unique capabilities of the F-22 Raptor, video courtesy of the U.S. Air Force:

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